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PRI's Environmental News Magazine

New Route for Keystone XL

 

One of President Trump’s first actions was to reverse his predecessor’s rejection of the Keystone XL pipeline project to carry carbon-heavy tar-sands crude from Canada to Texas. The Nebraska Public Service Commission approved a route for the project on November 20, 2017, but not the route the company preferred. As Living on Earth’s Jaime Kaiser explains, this gives pipeline opponents hope and possible cause to continue their fight, and may help put the economic feasibility of the project in jeopardy.

 

Read More »

One of President Trump’s first actions was to reverse his predecessor’s rejection of the Keystone XL pipeline project to carry carbon-heavy tar-sands crude from Canada to Texas. The Nebraska Public Service Commission approved a route for the project on November 20, 2017, but not the route the company preferred. As Living on Earth’s Jaime Kaiser explains, this gives pipeline opponents hope and possible cause to continue their fight, and may help put the economic feasibility of the project in jeopardy.

Meat 2.0

 

The Silicon Valley-based company Impossible Foods is aiming primarily at carnivores with its Impossible Burger, made from plant protein with a genetically engineered ingredient to look and taste as much as possible like red meat. And it’s already available in some restaurants.

 

Read More »

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American Seafood: Heritage, Culture & Cookery from Sea to Shining Sea

 

Barton Seaver is a chef with a mission: to rekindle America’s taste for abundant seafood. His new book catalogues more than 500 species of seafood interspersed with recipes, photographs, and an extensive history of America’s relationship with food from the sea. We join Seaver at a dockside fish market in Portland, Maine to scope out the freshest, most sustainable fish and shellfish – and then shuck oysters and cook up some tasty, fishery-friendly mackerel in his kitchen.

 

Read More »

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'America’s Pledge' to Paris

 

With President Trump walking back U.S. climate change mitigation efforts including the Paris Climate agreement, a coalition of U.S. cities, states, and businesses that represents more than half of the U.S. economy promises to continue reducing emissions, and launched America’s Pledge at the UN climate talks in Bonn, Germany.

 

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The Rights of Nature: A Legal Revolution That Could Save the World

 

Environmental lawyers are claiming in court that land, rivers, and other natural features should own themselves rather than be some person or entity’s property, much like the law already treats corporations as ‘persons.’ The case for treating elements of nature as legal ‘persons’ is outlined in the book, Rights of Nature: A Legal Revolution That Could Save the World by environmental lawyer David Boyd, and he explains how this approach can go a long way to protecting critical ecosystems from human exploitation and destruction.

 

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US Hails Atomic Power At Climate COP23

 

As global leaders meet for UN climate COP23 talks in Bonn, Germany, the U.S. delegation is promoting carbon-free nuclear energy as part of an “all of the above” strategy for climate protection. The Trump Administration also reports it is partnering with US companies to be world leaders on atomic power.

 

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Baby Polar Bear Rescue

 

Climate Change is making life difficult for polar bears across the world. But an orphaned Alaska bear cub is about to get a new home, and a new sibling, at the Buffalo Zoo in upstate New York.

 

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Hummingbirds Citizen Science Project

 

The Rufous hummingbird follows the Rocky Mountains to migrate from Alaska to Mexico (Photo: Diana Douglas for Hummingbirds at Home).

 

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Climate Change and Sea Level Rise

 

New research finds that every 1 degree Celsius of temperature rise eventually equates to 2.3 meters of sea level rise. Anders Levermann tells host Steve Curwood about the expectations for sea level rise over the next 2,000 years.

 

Read More »

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New Route for Keystone XL

One of President Trump’s first actions was to reverse his predecessor’s rejection of the Keystone XL pipeline project to carry carbon-heavy tar-sands crude from Canada to Texas. The Nebraska Public Service Commission approved a route for the project on November 20, 2017, but not the route the company preferred. As Living on Earth’s Jaime Kaiser explains, this gives pipeline opponents hope and possible cause to continue their fight, and may help put the economic feasibility of the project in jeopardy.

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Meat from Plants

The offerings of meat substitutes for vegetarians and vegans have leapt forward in recent years but for most meat-eaters, nothing quite measures up to the real thing. So a new plant-based burger with a key genetically-engineered ingredient attempts to appeal to carnivores, and we join a crowd of hungry students in Cambridge, Massachusetts for a taste test.

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American Seafood: Heritage, Culture & Cookery from Sea to Shining Sea

Barton Seaver is a chef with a mission: to rekindle America’s taste for abundant seafood. His new book catalogues more than 500 species of seafood interspersed with recipes, photographs, and an extensive history of America’s relationship with food from the sea. We join Seaver at a dockside fish market in Portland, Maine to scope out the freshest, most sustainable fish and shellfish – and then shuck oysters and cook up some tasty, fishery-friendly mackerel in his kitchen.

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This Week’s Show
November 24, 2017
listen / download


New Route for Keystone XL

listen / download
One of President Trump’s first actions was to reverse his predecessor’s rejection of the Keystone XL pipeline project to carry carbon-heavy tar-sands crude from Canada to Texas. The Nebraska Public Service Commission approved a route for the project on November 20, 2017, but not the route the company preferred. As Living on Earth’s Jaime Kaiser explains, this gives pipeline opponents hope and possible cause to continue their fight, and may help put the economic feasibility of the project in jeopardy.

Beyond The Headlines

listen / download
This week we cover the rapid rise in people registering for federal disaster aid after this year’s record-breaking hurricanes, wildfires and floods. We also note how the Pope regards climate denial, and remember an infamous environmental computer hack.

Meat from Plants

listen / download
The offerings of meat substitutes for vegetarians and vegans have leapt forward in recent years but for most meat-eaters, nothing quite measures up to the real thing. So a new plant-based burger with a key genetically-engineered ingredient attempts to appeal to carnivores, and we join a crowd of hungry students in Cambridge, Massachusetts for a taste test.

Meat 2.0

listen / download
The Silicon Valley-based company Impossible Foods is aiming primarily at carnivores with its Impossible Burger, made from plant protein with a genetically engineered ingredient to look and taste as much as possible like red meat. And it’s already available in some restaurants.

American Seafood: Heritage, Culture & Cookery from Sea to Shining Sea

listen / download
Barton Seaver is a chef with a mission: to rekindle America’s taste for abundant seafood. His new book catalogues more than 500 species of seafood interspersed with recipes, photographs, and an extensive history of America’s relationship with food from the sea. We join Seaver at a dockside fish market in Portland, Maine to scope out the freshest, most sustainable fish and shellfish – and then shuck oysters and cook up some tasty, fishery-friendly mackerel in his kitchen.


Special Features

Field Note: Big White Dog Wants to Play!
Living on Earth's Explorer-in-Residence Mark Seth Lender describes how plastic is common even in the Arctic, where he met a playful polar bear.
Blog Series: Mark Seth Lender Field Notes

Close Encounter with a Tabular Iceberg: Mark Seth Lender
Living on Earth's Resident Explorer Mark Seth Lender describes an encounter with a tabular iceberg similar (though much smaller) to the one that recently broke off of the Larsen C ice sheet.
Blog Series: Mark Seth Lender Field Notes


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...Ultimately, if we are going prevent large parts of this Earth from becoming not only inhospitable but uninhabitable in our lifetimes, we are going to have to keep some fossil fuels in the ground rather than burn them...

-- President Barack Obama, November 6, 2015 on why he declined to approve the Keystone XL Pipeline.

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