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PRI's Environmental News Magazine

Top Gear for the Electric Car

 

European nations and marquee car brands are setting a fast pace to electrify personal transport. CarTalk blogger and green car journalist Jim Motavalli explains what’s in play in the current electric and hybrid car revolution, and how these vehicles will benefit the planet.

 

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European nations and marquee car brands are setting a fast pace to electrify personal transport. CarTalk blogger and green car journalist Jim Motavalli explains what’s in play in the current electric and hybrid car revolution, and how these vehicles will benefit the planet.

Obesity and House Dust

 

Certain hormones tell our bodies at times whether or not to create fat cells, and hormone disrupting chemicals can confuse those messages. Such chemicals are found in many consumer items including pesticides, flame retardants, and plastics. They also turn up in house dust, and new research from Duke University found that typical amounts of household dust spurred the growth of mouse fat cells in a lab dish.

 

Read More »

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A Key to Long-Term Nuclear Waste Storage

 

Finland is moving ahead with a system to store radioactive nuclear waste for 100,000 years, a possible example for other nuclear countries still struggling to come up with a plan. In addition to significant engineering challenges of storing nuclear waste safely, community acceptance is key for success.

 

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Standing Bear Comes in Peace

 

Where there is sea ice, polar bears enjoy the eternal days of the Arctic summer, and one young female seems perfectly at ease – until a strange floating object across the pack ice catches her curiosity. Living on Earth’s Resident Explorer Mark Seth Lender describes her reaction to the ship and the humans who are curiously watching her.

 

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Trump Rollback of Methane Rule Blocked

 

The D.C Circuit Court of Appeals recently blocked the Environmental Protection Agency from suspending a regulation that requires new oil and gas wells to reduce their methane emissions. David Doniger of the Natural Resources Defense Council explained what the ruling means for the EPA, the oil and gas industry and environmental groups.

 

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Henry David Thoreau Turns 200

 

Walden Pond, where Henry David Thoreau famously ‘lived deliberately’ in a hand-built cabin, is a popular destination. Thoreau walked, thought and observed in the surrounding woods. The Walden Woods Project was created to preserve this landscape and help students and teachers learn about him, his philosophy and nature itself. Living on Earth’s Jenni Doering went to the woods to find out how and why Thoreau’s legacy lives on 200 years later.

 

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Climate Departure Date

 

A group of scientists at the University of Hawaii have figured out a way to project when the climate at a given location will move outside the range of anything we’ve known in modern times. It’s sooner then you think.

 

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Deepwater Disaster Three Years On

 

Just three years ago, the Deep Water Horizon oil spill poured 200 million gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. Now, a team of chemists, engineers, and biologists is attempting to assess the damage to the Gulf ecosystem.

 

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Australia May Scrap Carbon Tax

 

China is the world’s largest emitter, and much of its coal comes from Australia. With the election of a new Prime Minister, Australia looks set to revoke its carbon tax, leaving many environmentalists worried about their country’s contribution to climate change. (photo: Bigstockphoto.com)

 

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Top Gear for the Electric Car

European nations and marquee car brands are setting a fast pace to electrify personal transport. CarTalk blogger and green car journalist Jim Motavalli explains what’s in play in the current electric and hybrid car revolution, and how these vehicles will benefit the planet.

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Warning About Antimicrobial Triclosan

Two hundred scientists and health professionals signed a statement calling for more caution in using triclosan and triclocarbon. These common antibacterials are in thousands of products from building materials to toothpaste, and impact hormonal systems in animals.

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Obesity and House Dust

Certain hormones tell our bodies at times whether or not to create fat cells, and hormone disrupting chemicals can confuse those messages. Such chemicals are found in many consumer items including pesticides, flame retardants, and plastics. They also turn up in house dust, and new research from Duke University found that typical amounts of household dust spurred the growth of mouse fat cells in a lab dish.

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This Week’s Show
July 14, 2017
listen / download


Top Gear for the Electric Car

listen / download
European nations and marquee car brands are setting a fast pace to electrify personal transport. CarTalk blogger and green car journalist Jim Motavalli explains what’s in play in the current electric and hybrid car revolution, and how these vehicles will benefit the planet.

Warning About Antimicrobial Triclosan

listen / download
Two hundred scientists and health professionals signed a statement calling for more caution in using triclosan and triclocarbon. These common antibacterials are in thousands of products from building materials to toothpaste, and impact hormonal systems in animals.

Obesity and House Dust

listen / download
Certain hormones tell our bodies at times whether or not to create fat cells, and hormone disrupting chemicals can confuse those messages. Such chemicals are found in many consumer items including pesticides, flame retardants, and plastics. They also turn up in house dust, and new research from Duke University found that typical amounts of household dust spurred the growth of mouse fat cells in a lab dish.

Steelmaker, Employer and Polluter

listen / download
People who live in and around Clairton, about 15 miles south of Pittsburgh, are suing US Steel, claiming air pollution from its Clairton Coke Works has lowered property values. The Allegheny Front’s Julie Grant visited Clairton to understand how this source of good jobs could also be the cause of health and environmental problems.

BirdNote: The Snake Bird

listen / download
As it snakes along just below the surface of a Louisiana bayou, you can see how the long-necked Anhinga got its nickname. BirdNote’s Michael Stein says its serrated beak make it a danger to fish.

A Key to Long-Term Nuclear Waste Storage

listen / download
Finland is moving ahead with a system to store radioactive nuclear waste for 100,000 years, a possible example for other nuclear countries still struggling to come up with a plan. In addition to significant engineering challenges of storing nuclear waste safely, community acceptance is key for success.

Standing Bear Comes in Peace

listen / download
Where there is sea ice, polar bears enjoy the eternal days of the Arctic summer, and one young female seems perfectly at ease – until a strange floating object across the pack ice catches her curiosity. Living on Earth’s Resident Explorer Mark Seth Lender describes her reaction to the ship and the humans who are curiously watching her.


Special Features

A River Town in Transition

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Wrangell, Alaska is a small, isolated town at the mouth of the mighty Stikine River and a former a timber capital. But since the saw mills shut down in the ‘90s, the small town has reinvented itself as a tourist destination and a commercial fishing hub. Since both of these industries are dependent on the Stikine, some locals worry that a mining development upriver could put the whole town’s livelihood at risk.
Blog Series: Alaskan River Riches

Cowee, North Carolina

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Living on Earth is giving a voice to Orion magazine’s longtime feature in which people write about the place they call home. In this week’s edition, songwriter Angela-Faye Martin uses her words and music to picture her North Carolina valley on the edge of the Great Smoky Mountains.
Blog Series: The Place Where You Live


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...Ultimately, if we are going prevent large parts of this Earth from becoming not only inhospitable but uninhabitable in our lifetimes, we are going to have to keep some fossil fuels in the ground rather than burn them...

-- President Barack Obama, November 6, 2015 on why he declined to approve the Keystone XL Pipeline.

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